Adding freeze-dried to your vegetable stir-fry will provide a much-needed dose of protein. | MAKIKO ITOH

Recipe: Kōya dōfu and bok choy stir-fry


The cooking custom of shōjin ryōri, a vegetarian cuisine that arose due to the dietary limitations of Zen Buddhist monks, along with prolonged periods in Japanese history in which eating meat was discouraged or disallowed, has left the nation with a variety of vegetable-based dishes that serve as sources of protein.An active ingredient in one such dish is Kōya dōfu (freeze-dried tofu also called kōri dōfu). Dating back to at least the Kamakura Period (1192-1333), Kōya dōfu was generally made by slicing firm tofu, positioning it in rows on boxes lined with straw and letting it sit outside during freezing temperature levels throughout the winter season. The frozen tofu was then hung up out of the sun to dry. Unlike fresh tofu, which goes off really rapidly, Kōya dōfu can be kept in a cool, dry place without refrigeration for a substantial amount of time.As noted above, the Japanese use 2 terms to refer to freeze-dried tofu. The more typical one, Kōya dōfu, originates from the theory that the process was created by monks on Mount Koya in present-day Wakayama Prefecture. Nevertheless, there is likewise proof that frozen tofu existed in the Shinshu (contemporary Nagano Prefecture) and Tohoku areas of the country where it was called shimi dōfu (frozen tofu). The “shi” in “shimi” is composed utilizing the very same kanji as “kō” in “kōri,” accounting for the other term. If you have an interest in discovering more about the history of the food, inspect out Akira Yamashitas “Kōri dōfu no Rekishi” (” The History of Frozen Tofu”), released in 1962. If youre going to use Kōya dōfu then it needs to be soaked in water prior to it is prepared, and the water requires to be squeezed out well to remove its really small odor. Later, the tofu becomes like a sponge, all set to soak up flavors. In this weeks dish I have instilled the tofu with an umami-rich liquid to pack it with taste, and have actually treated it much like you may use chicken in a stir-fry. Dish:
Serves 2Prep: 25 mins., plus soaking timeCook: 15 mins.Ingredients:

3 dried shiitake mushrooms
2 pieces Kōya dōfu (freeze-dried tofu).
2 tablespoons soy sauce.
2 tablespoons mirin.
1/2 teaspoon konbu (kelp) dashi stock powder.
around 5 tablespoons potato starch (katakuriko) or cornstarch.
1 piece ginger.
1 garlic clove.
1 little red chili pepper.
2 medium bok choy.
2 tablespoons sesame oil.
salt and pepper.

A minimum of an hour prior to making the meal (or the night prior to), soak the dried shiitake mushrooms in sufficient water to cover.
Pour enough warm water (at about 50 degrees Celsius) over the Kōya dōfu to cover. Delegate soak for 10 to 15 minutes, turning once. Eject firmly and cut into bite-size pieces.
If needed, include sufficient water to bring the soaking water up to 200 milliliters. Integrate this with the soy mirin, sauce and konbu dashi stock powder, and then include the cut up Kōya dōfu.
Finely mince the ginger and garlic. Separate the bok choy leaves, and cut up the white parts into pieces. De-seed and finely slice the chili pepper.
Drain pipes the tofu pieces gently, and coat with 3 or 4 tablespoons of potato starch or cornstarch. Reserve the soaking liquid. Heat up a fry pan with the sesame oil over medium-high heat. Pan fry the Kōya dōfu, turning the pieces to brown all sides. Take the browned pieces out of the pan and reserve.
Add the chili, ginger and garlic pepper to the fry pan and stir-fry briefly. Include the bok choy and stir-fry until wilted. Season with salt and pepper.
Dissolve a teaspoon of potato starch or cornstarch into the reserved soaking liquid. Clear an area in the frying pan and include the liquid. Include the Kōya dōfu back to the pan. Stir it up until the liquid has actually thickened a little and coats the active ingredients. Serve with rice.

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The culinary custom of shōjin ryōri, a vegetarian cuisine that developed due to the dietary limitations of Zen Buddhist monks, as well as extended durations in Japanese history in which eating meat was prevented or banned, has left the country with a range of vegetable-based meals that act as sources of protein.An ingredient in one such meal is Kōya dōfu (freeze-dried tofu also known as kōri dōfu). Dating back to at least the Kamakura Period (1192-1333), Kōya dōfu was generally made by slicing company tofu, positioning it in rows on boxes lined with straw and letting it sit outside throughout freezing temperature levels throughout the winter season. Unlike fresh tofu, which goes off very quickly, Kōya dōfu can be kept in a cool, dry place without refrigeration for a considerable quantity of time.As kept in mind above, the Japanese usage 2 terms to refer to freeze-dried tofu. There is also proof that frozen tofu existed in the Shinshu (present-day Nagano Prefecture) and Tohoku regions of the nation where it was called shimi dōfu (frozen tofu). If you are interested in finding out more about the history of the food, check out Akira Yamashitas “Kōri dōfu no Rekishi” (” The History of Frozen Tofu”), published in 1962.

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