A new study provides evidence that cannabidiol, a component of cannabis, can inhibit the motivation to consume methamphetamine in rats. The preliminary findings suggest that the substance could be useful in fighting addiction to methamphetamine. : Health


The title of the post is a copy and paste from the first two paragraphs of the linked academic press release here:

A new study in the Journal of Psychopharmacology provides evidence that cannabidiol, a component of cannabis, can inhibit the motivation to consume methamphetamine in rats.

The preliminary findings suggest that the substance could be useful in fighting addiction to methamphetamine, which has become one of the most common drugs of abuse around the world.

Journal Reference:

Cannabidiol treatment reduces the motivation to self-administer methamphetamine and methamphetamine-primed relapse in rats

Gracie L Hay*, Sarah J Baracz*, Nicholas A Everett, Jessica Roberts, Priscila A Costa, Jonathon C Arnold, Iain S McGregor, Jennifer L Cornish

Journal of Psychopharmacology

Doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/0269881118799954

Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0269881118799954

Abstract

Background:

Methamphetamine is an addictive stimulant that can cause many adverse physical, psychological and psychosocial effects. Preliminary evidence shows cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating constituent of the cannabis plant, may have efficacy in treating opioid and nicotine dependence. However, no study has yet examined whether cannabidiol treatment might impact on methamphetamine addiction.

Aims:

The current study investigated whether cannabidiol administration reduces the motivation to self-administer methamphetamine and relapse to methamphetamine-seeking behavior following abstinence.

Methods:

Thirty-two male Sprague Dawley rats with implanted jugular vein catheters were initially trained to self-administer methamphetamine via lever press during two-hour sessions on a fixed ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement. Rats in experiment 1 (n=16) then advanced to a progressive ratio reinforcement schedule to examine the effects of cannabidiol (0, 20, 40, and 80 mg/kg intraperitoneal) on motivation to self-administer methamphetamine. Rats in experiment 2 (n=16) were tested for cannabidiol effects on methamphetamine-primed reinstatement following extinction.

Results:

Cannabidiol (80 mg/kg, but not 40 mg/kg, or 20 mg/kg) reduced the motivation to self-administer methamphetamine and attenuated methamphetamine-primed relapse to methamphetamine-seeking behavior after extinction.

Conclusion:

This is the first demonstration that cannabidiol can reduce the motivation to seek and consume methamphetamine, and suggests that cannabidiol might be worth trialing as a novel pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine dependence.



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